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Built Environment; Healthy Communities, Healthy Homes, Healthy People

By Environmental Protection Agency

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Book Id: WPLBN0000035281
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 3.8 MB
Reproduction Date: 2007
Full Text

Title: Built Environment; Healthy Communities, Healthy Homes, Healthy People  
Author: Environmental Protection Agency
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Ecology, Natural resource issues, Environemtal protection
Collections: Environmental Awareness Library Collection
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: United States Environmental Protection Agency

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Agency, E. P. (n.d.). Built Environment; Healthy Communities, Healthy Homes, Healthy People. Retrieved from http://www.worldebooklibrary.net/


Description
Excerpt: The built environment— human-modified places such as homes, schools, workplaces, parks, industrial areas, farms, roads and highways—is our most important habitat, since 80% of North Americans live in towns and cities and spend 90% of their time indoors (Hancock, 2002). To date, much of the discussion on the built environment has focused on the challenges of providing adequate transportation (roads, highways, infrastructure, public transportation), on issues relating to urban sprawl, air pollution due to increased traffic, the unavailability of sidewalks and the lack of a natural environment. New evidence however increasingly recognizes that even the places where we live and work clearly affect our health (Wilson, Seal, McManigal, Lovins, Cureton, Browning, 1998); yet causal relationships between the built environment and specific human illnesses are often difficult to ascertain (Hodgson, 2002). Although some recent research explores the effect of improved built environments on physical activity (Handy, Boarnet, Ewing, Killingsworth, 2002), asthma (Rauh, Chew, Garfinkel, 2002), obesity (Morland, Wing, Diez Roux, Poole, 2002), cardiovascular and lung cancer mortality (Pope et al, 2002), and mental health (Halpern, 1995; Weich, Blanchard, Prince, Burton, Erens, Sproston, 2002), there remains a pressing need for more concerted research to identify mechanisms by which the built environment adversely impacts health and to develop appropriate interventions to reduce or eliminate harmful health effects. These research efforts are necessitated by the growing costs of health care associated with higher chronic disease incidence (e.g., obesity, asthma, cardiovascular disease, cancer). Etiology of all these diseases complex diseases is directly related to factors in the broad physical, chemical and social environment, including those attributable to the built environment.

Table of Contents
Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Shobha Srinivasan, Liam O'Fallon, and Allen Dearry, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences KEYNOTE PRESENTATIONS CREATING A HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT: THE IMPACT OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT ON PUBLIC HEALTH Richard J. Jackson, National Center for Environmental Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention HYGEIA 21, OR, HEALTHY BUILDINGS IN HEALTHY COMMUNITIES IN HEALTHY ECOSYSTEMS: SUSTAINING PEOPLE AND THE PLANET Trevor Hancock, Board of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment HEALTHY COMMUNITIES MUST ALSO BE SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES Trevor Hancock, Board of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment SESSION 1: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES Howard Frumkin, Emory University DETERIORATED HOUSING: A TOXIC ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE Virginia Rauh, Columbia University DESIGN AS IF PEOPLE MATTERED: FOSTERING HEALTH AND PRODUCTIVITY IN THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT Alexis Karolides, Rocky Mountain Institute SESSION 2: HEALTH IMPACTS AIR POLLUTION AND ITS HEALTH EFFECTS George Thurston, New York University MEASURING RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN URBAN FORM, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY LEVELS, AND PUBLIC HEALTH Lawrence Frank, Georgia Institute of Technology INTER- AND INTRA-ETHNIC VARIATION IN WATER-RELATED EXPOSURES AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISK PERCEPTION AMONG TUCSON RESIDENTS: THE ROLE OF CULTURE & ENVIRONMENTAL EQUITY Bryan Williams, University of Arizona SESSION 3: PARTNERSHIPS FOR ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY COMMUNITIES THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT: HEALTH DAMAGING OR HEALTH PROMOTING Robert Lawrence, John Hopkins University THE RELATIONSHIP OF HOUSING AND HEALTH ON RESEARCH AND PROGRAMS David Jacobs, US Department of Housing and Urban Development COMMUNITIES COUNT: SOCIAL AND HEALTH INDICATORS FOR KING COUNTY, WASHINGTON Kathryn Horsley, Public Health – Seattle-King County

 

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